News

Volume XLIII Vol IV:  ASME Pressure Vessels

Volume XLIII Vol IV: ASME Pressure Vessels

Jan 08, 2020

Flanged and dished heads can be formed from carbon steel, stainless steel, and other ferrous and nonferrous metals and alloys. Flanged and dished heads can be formed in a size range from 4 inches to 300 inches diameter and in thickness range of 1/8 in. to 1 ½ inches thick. The ASME Section VIII – Division 1 determines the rules for dished heads. The most common configurations are spherical, hemispherical, elliptical (or ellipsoidal) and torispherical shapes. Read more

Volume XLIII Vol III:  ASME Pressure Vessels

Volume XLIII Vol III: ASME Pressure Vessels

Jan 07, 2020

The ASME Section VIII, rules for fired or unfired pressure vessels, is divided into three divisions applicable to design, fabrication, inspection, testing, and certification. The formulae and allowable stresses presented in this sketch are only for Division 1, the main code. It contains mandatory and nonmandatory appendices detailing supplementary design criteria, nondestructive examination and inspection acceptance standards. Read more

Volume XLIII Vol II:  ASME Pressure Vessels

Volume XLIII Vol II: ASME Pressure Vessels

Jan 07, 2020

The formulae in ASME Section I and Section VIII are used to determine the minimum required thickness and design pressure of piping, tubes, drums and headers using the Maximum Allowable Working Pressure (MAWP). However, Paragraph UG-31 states, that these formulae may be also used for calculating wall thickness of tubes and pipes under internal pressure. Read more

Volume XLIII Vol I:  ASME Pressure Vessels

Volume XLIII Vol I: ASME Pressure Vessels

Jan 07, 2020

The ASME Code design criteria consist of basic rules specifying the design method, design loads, allowable stress, acceptable materials, fabrication, testing, certification and inspection requirements. The design method known as "design by rule" uses design pressure, allowable stress and a design formula compatible with the geometry to calculate the minimum required thickness of pressurized tanks, vessels and pipes. Read more

Volume XLII:  ASME Pressure Vessels

Volume XLII: ASME Pressure Vessels

Sep 04, 2019

Many refineries boast about their energy conservation or efficiency improvement programs they have had in place for decades. With recent increases in energy costs, however, most have further room for improvement. Opportunities are likely to be abundant, particularly in areas often neglected. Read more

Volume XLI:  ASME Pressure Vessels

Volume XLI: ASME Pressure Vessels

Aug 16, 2019

Did a recent external inspection on an exchanger reveal pitting corrosion under the insulation? Did a unit upset result in internal pitting on the bottom head of the reactor? If you answered yes to these questions, or if pitting corrosion due to other factors is occurring in your plant, an API-579-1 FFS pitting assessment may provide an alternative to costly repairs. Read more

Volume XL:  ASME Pressure Vessels

Volume XL: ASME Pressure Vessels

Aug 16, 2019

The required internal inspection interval of an Aboveground Atmospheric Storage Tank (AST) must be determined based on corrosion rates measured during previous inspections or anticipated based on experience with similar tanks in similar service. Read more

Volume XXXIX:  ASME Pressure Vessels

Volume XXXIX: ASME Pressure Vessels

May 28, 2019

API-653, Tank Repair and Alteration, intends that repairs and alterations made on an Aboveground Atmospheric Storage Tank (AST) result in general equivalence to API-650 requirements. Section 9 of API-653, contains specific requirements that are intended to meet this objective. After the AST has been in service for some time, thinning due to corrosion may require that sections of the shell be repaired in order for the tank to have adequate strength for its next period of operation. Such repairs are generally done by installing insert plates into the shell using full-thickness butt welds. Read more

Volume XXXVIII Vol II:  ASME Pressure Vessels

Volume XXXVIII Vol II: ASME Pressure Vessels

Apr 29, 2019

This is the second in our series of articles covering rerating of refinery and chemical plant processing equipment. Heat exchangers sometimes must be uprated due to an increase in design pressure or temperature when a plant is debottlenecked. At other times, corrosion in excess of the original corrosion allowance may have occurred and a decision may have to be made whether to repair, replace, or downrate the exchanger. In either case, a mechanical design engineer is usually responsible for making what is sometimes referred to as “rerating” calculations. Read more

Volume XXXVIII Vol I:  ASME Pressure Vessels

Volume XXXVIII Vol I: ASME Pressure Vessels

Mar 15, 2019

Frequently when debottlenecking process plant equipment, the possibility of increasing the equipment's design temperature, design pressure, or both comes up. This process of re-evaluating the equipment for more severe design conditions is usually referred to as uprating. Read more

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